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Tag: medical news

Knoxville’s Black Community Endured Deeply Rooted Racism. Now There Is Medical Debt.
News Articles

Knoxville’s Black Community Endured Deeply Rooted Racism. Now There Is Medical Debt.

(Originally published Oct. 28, 2022) By Noam N. Levey, California Healthline KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — When Dr. H.M. Green opened his new medical office building on East Vine Avenue in 1922, Black residents of this city on the Tennessee River could be seen only in the basement of Knoxville General Hospital. They were barred from the city’s other three medical centers. Green, one of America’s leading Black physicians, spent his life working to end health inequities like this. He installed an X-ray machine, an operating room, and a private infirmary in his building to serve Black patients. On the first floor was a pharmacy. Today the Green Medical Arts Building has been replaced by a tangle of freeways that were built after the city’s Black business district was bulldozed ...
Deadly Marburg virus cases confirmed in Ghana
News Briefs — Africa

Deadly Marburg virus cases confirmed in Ghana

The first cases of the deadly Marburg virus have been confirmed in Ghana after two people died, health officials announced on Sunday. According to the World Health Organization, tests were conducted on the two infected people in Ghana and returned a positive result on July 10, but needed to be verified by a lab in Senegal for the cases to be confirmed.  The highly infectious disease is similar to Ebola and currently has no cure. The fatality rate is up to nearly 90% for those who have been infected by the virus. Marburg was first discovered in Europe in 1967. The diseases is often transmitted by fruit bats, but can spread from human contact through blood and saliva. The recent confirmed cases are the second outbreak of Marburg in West Africa; the virus was detected in Guinea last ye...
Doctors puzzled by mysterious “nosebleed” disease that killed 3 people in Tanzania
News Briefs — Africa

Doctors puzzled by mysterious “nosebleed” disease that killed 3 people in Tanzania

Doctors in Tanzania are trying to learn more about a mysterious disease that has reportedly killed three people so far and infected at least 10 others. The unidentified illness has several symptoms, including nosebleeds, fever, headaches, and fatigue, according to government medical officials in Tanzania. Doctors believe the illness is possibly caused by an unknown viral hemorrhagic fever -- a virus that damages the walls of small blood vessels causing them to release blood. The symptoms of the unknown illness resembles that of several viruses, including Ebola, the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, Lassa fever, and Marburg. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), these viruses have the potential to trigger pandemics. All of the patients stricken by the mysterious illne...
13-year-old Black girl makes history after getting accepted to medical school
News Briefs

13-year-old Black girl makes history after getting accepted to medical school

A 13-year-old Black girl has reportedly made history by becoming the youngest Black student to be accepted into medical school. Alena Wicker, who is enrolled at Arizona State University where she is pursuing an engineering degree, announced her acceptance to medical school on her Instagram page. According to 12News, Wicker is the youngest Black person to be accepted into medical school. The college junior was accepted to University of Alabama at Birmingham’s Heersink School of Medicine through the Burroughs Wellcome Scholars Early Assurance Program, according to the teen’s social media. “I graduated High school LAST YEAR at 12 years old and here I am one year later I’ve been accepted into Med School at 13,” an Instagram post under the moniker thebrownstemgirl. More about Alena’s acc...
News Briefs

Study: Telemedicine narrowed gap between Black and non-Black patients accessing primary care in 2020

A study released this week indicates the gap between Black and non-Black patients who visited their primary care providers narrowed significantly during the pandemic in 2020. Completed primary care visits among Black patients jumped to 80% in 2020 compared to about 60% in 2019. Completed visits among non-Black patients increased by about 10% — 60% in 2019 to 70% in 2020, according to the study. The findings came from researchers at Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and were published in the Telemedicine and e-Health journal. The study used electronic health records from more than 1.9 million appointments and compared data during four 3-month periods in 2020 with data from 2019. The data was provided by 60 primary care clinics in the Philadelphia area. ...
News Briefs

Study finds link between Vitamin D deficiency and breast cancer risk among Black and Hispanic women

Have you taken your Vitamin D lately? A new health study shows a link between increased breast cancer risk and Vitamin D deficiency among Black and Hispanic women in the United States. Researchers analyzed blood samples from 290 Black and 125 Hispanic women who were later diagnosed with breast cancer, as well as samples from 1,010 Black and 437 Hispanic women who did not develop breast cancer. The researchers found that during an average follow-up of about 9.2 years, women with sufficient vitamin D levels had a 21% lower breast cancer rate than women with Vitamin D deficiency. Black women with sufficient Vitamin D levels had an 11% lower rate of breast cancer. But the link was strongest with Hispanic women who had a 48% lower rate of breast cancer if they had sufficient Vitamin D lev...