Wednesday, November 30“Racism never sleeps.”

Tag: health

Knoxville’s Black Community Endured Deeply Rooted Racism. Now There Is Medical Debt.
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Knoxville’s Black Community Endured Deeply Rooted Racism. Now There Is Medical Debt.

(Originally published Oct. 28, 2022) By Noam N. Levey, California Healthline KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — When Dr. H.M. Green opened his new medical office building on East Vine Avenue in 1922, Black residents of this city on the Tennessee River could be seen only in the basement of Knoxville General Hospital. They were barred from the city’s other three medical centers. Green, one of America’s leading Black physicians, spent his life working to end health inequities like this. He installed an X-ray machine, an operating room, and a private infirmary in his building to serve Black patients. On the first floor was a pharmacy. Today the Green Medical Arts Building has been replaced by a tangle of freeways that were built after the city’s Black business district was bulldozed ...
Study: Forehead thermometer readings possibly less accurate among Black patients
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Study: Forehead thermometer readings possibly less accurate among Black patients

A new study indicates forehead thermometers are possibly not as accurate when it comes to reading temperatures for Black patients compared with oral thermometers. Forehead thermometer readings were 26% lower than oral thermometers, according to the study conducted by researchers at Emory University and the University of Hawaii. Researchers noted that though the differences were not high, fevers could go unrecognized if the reading is below the common figures used to determine fever. The study also said this difference could contribute to a higher death rate among Black patients. For the study, the temperatures of 2,031 Black patients and 2,344 White patients were taken within the first hour of hospitalization. Temperatures only varied among Black patients. Researchers said s...
CDC: Monkeypox disproportionately affecting Black, Latino gay men
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CDC: Monkeypox disproportionately affecting Black, Latino gay men

New statistics provided by the CDC indicates Black and Latino men who have sex with other men currently account for more than half of the cases of Monkeypox in the United States. On Aug. 16, the CDC reported 12,689 cases of Monkeypox in the U.S. Currently , there are more than 38,000 cases around the world. Monkeypox can be transmitted through close physical contact with any sex or sexual orientation, but the cases of new infection skew toward men and transgender people who have sex with men. The increase in Monkeypox cases among men of color appears similar to the historical disparities in HIV/AIDS cases in the United States. Recent CDC data shows about 99% of Monkeypox cases were men, and 94% of them reported sex or other close physical contact with other men. The CDC released da...
Black woman carrying fetus with fatal condition denied abortion in Louisiana
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Black woman carrying fetus with fatal condition denied abortion in Louisiana

Louisiana’s strict abortion laws in the wake of the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade reversal has reportedly prevented Black woman from undergoing an abortion after she discovered her fetus has a fatal defect. Nancy Davis woman said even though her baby was diagnosed with Acrania, which she discovered after reviewing an ultrasound, doctors have told her they will not be able to perform an abortion, reported NOLA. Acrania is an unsurvivable condition in which part of a fetus’ skull is missing. The baby does not survive after birth more than a few days or weeks. Louisiana is now among the most difficult states in the U.S. for women to receive an abortion. Exceptions include if a pregnancy endangers the life of the mother or the fetus has a fatal condition. According to NOLA, Davis is being de...
Back to School: For some kids, supplies are the least of their worries
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Back to School: For some kids, supplies are the least of their worries

Back to school has either arrived or is fast approaching for many children. For the millions of low-income students with food insecurities that depend on schools for free and/or reduced price breakfast to start the day — and lunches to sustain them from hunger — the school year could not start any faster. You may find it hard to believe that in America there are children that have food insecurities. Food insecurity, for those who may not know, is considered the state of being without reliable access to a sufficient amounts of affordable and nutritious food. This does not mean just healthy or affordable foods, but the uncertain access to adequate food (not just snacks, or a potato, but enough food to sufficiently meet the nutritional needs of the individual). Food insecurity and hunger...
Last case of Marburg Virus in Ghana has recovered, health officials say
News Briefs — Africa

Last case of Marburg Virus in Ghana has recovered, health officials say

The last known case of Marburg Virus Disease (MVD) in Ghana has fully recovered, health officials announced yesterday. Last month, the World Health Organization confirmed there were three cases of the deadly Marburg Virus. Two people infected with the virus reportedly have died -- an adult male and 14-month-old child. In July, the country confirmed the outbreak of Marburg. MVD is a highly infectious disease similar to Ebola. It has been linked to fruit bats. RELATED: Deadly Marburg virus cases confirmed in Ghana Nearly 200 people who came into contact with the three people infected were followed up with by health experts. None of those people have presented any symptoms of the virus, according to Ghana Health Service. Last month's infections were the second time the Marb...
Doctors puzzled by mysterious “nosebleed” disease that killed 3 people in Tanzania
News Briefs — Africa

Doctors puzzled by mysterious “nosebleed” disease that killed 3 people in Tanzania

Doctors in Tanzania are trying to learn more about a mysterious disease that has reportedly killed three people so far and infected at least 10 others. The unidentified illness has several symptoms, including nosebleeds, fever, headaches, and fatigue, according to government medical officials in Tanzania. Doctors believe the illness is possibly caused by an unknown viral hemorrhagic fever -- a virus that damages the walls of small blood vessels causing them to release blood. The symptoms of the unknown illness resembles that of several viruses, including Ebola, the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, Lassa fever, and Marburg. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), these viruses have the potential to trigger pandemics. All of the patients stricken by the mysterious illne...
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Fund apologizes for role in Tuskegee experiment that used Black men

The organization that made funeral payments to families of Black men killed in the infamous Tuskegee study that lasted about 40 years, has issued an apology decades after the study ended. Over the weekend, the New York-based fund made an apology to descendants of the victims used in the study. It isn’t the first apology over the controversial study which ended nearly 50 years ago after the experiments became public knowledge. Former President Bill Clinton also issued an apology during his administration. Researchers for the federal government knowingly allowed hundreds of Black men in Alabama die of syphilis so that the disease could be studied. The experiments started in the 1930s and lasted nearly 40 years. The families of the deceased men typically received payments under $100 to co...
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Study: Telemedicine narrowed gap between Black and non-Black patients accessing primary care in 2020

A study released this week indicates the gap between Black and non-Black patients who visited their primary care providers narrowed significantly during the pandemic in 2020. Completed primary care visits among Black patients jumped to 80% in 2020 compared to about 60% in 2019. Completed visits among non-Black patients increased by about 10% — 60% in 2019 to 70% in 2020, according to the study. The findings came from researchers at Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and were published in the Telemedicine and e-Health journal. The study used electronic health records from more than 1.9 million appointments and compared data during four 3-month periods in 2020 with data from 2019. The data was provided by 60 primary care clinics in the Philadelphia area. ...
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Black smokers love menthols — And Biden’s ban is closer to ashing them

Still love them menthols? Almost a year after pledging to extinguish the controversial cigarettes, President Joe Biden’s proposal to put out menthols once and for all just got closer to reality. The FDA released a plan today to ban menthol flavored cigarettes, and it has a lot of Black folks puffing — not just smokers. Blacks in the U.S. are more likely to suffer health issues related to smoking compared to White smokers who light up at about the same rate, CDC research has found. However, the CDC study shows nearly two thirds of Black smokers prefer menthol flavored cigarettes. Biden isn’t the first President to try to stomp out menthols. Former President Obama, who openly struggled with putting down the lighter, was urged by many Black health care professionals to ban...