Wednesday, November 30“Racism never sleeps.”

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With no child tax credit and inflation on the rise, families are slipping back into poverty
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With no child tax credit and inflation on the rise, families are slipping back into poverty

This story was originally published by The 19th Child poverty rates have crept back up since the program expired, leaving families struggling with food insecurity and insufficiency. By Rebekah Barber, The 19th A year ago, the expanded child tax credit ended. Between 2020 and 2021, the credit — which gave monthly payments of up to $300 per child — helped reduce child poverty by more than 40 percent. More than 36 million families received the credit in 2021, and the money helped push the child poverty rate below that of adults for the first time. But since the program expired, child poverty rates have crept back up. U.S. households are having to pay between $300 to $400 more each month compared to last year because of inflation. Food insecurity is rising once again. Now, ...
“I Don’t Know Where I’m Going to Go”: HUD Displaces Even More Residents in This Small City
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“I Don’t Know Where I’m Going to Go”: HUD Displaces Even More Residents in This Small City

This story was originally published by ProPublica. By Molly Parker, Lee Enterprises Midwest Series: HUD’s House of Cards Public Housing Failures It was the last Friday in October, and barges filled with mounds of glistening coal sat parked in the Ohio River below Lee Esther Logan’s high-rise public housing apartment complex in Cairo, Illinois. Wispy white clouds streaked a baby blue sky. The panoramic waterfront view is one that normally gives Logan peace as she takes it in from the brown recliner on her balcony. But on the day I visited her, Logan wasn’t at peace. She was anxious. Two days prior, officials from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development had called Logan and about 60 of her fellow public housing residents to a meeting. An engineering...
Rob Bonta Investigates Hospital Algorithms for Racial Bias
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Rob Bonta Investigates Hospital Algorithms for Racial Bias

By Mark Kreidler November 18, 2022 SACRAMENTO — California Attorney General Rob Bonta sailed to victory in the Nov. 8 election, riding his progressive record on reproductive rights, gun control, and social justice reform. As he charts a course for his next four years, the 50-year-old Democrat wants to target racial discrimination in health care, including through an investigation of software programs and decision-making tools used by hospitals to treat patients. Bonta, the first Filipino American to serve as the state’s top prosecutor, asked 30 hospital CEOs in August for a list of the commercial software programs their facilities use to support clinical decisions, schedule operating rooms, and guide billing practices. In exchange, he offered them confidentiality. His goal, B...
Using campaign funds for child care is legal — but Herschel Walker is using it as an attack
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Using campaign funds for child care is legal — but Herschel Walker is using it as an attack

This story was originally published by The 19th Republicans have tried to make Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock’s campaign expenses an issue, and advocates worry this could discourage parents of young children from running for office.  By Mel Leonor Barclay, The 19th Federal election rules began to allow candidates to use campaign funds to cover child care expenses for the first time just four years ago, mainly at the request of women candidates who said it was crucial to their candidacies. Now, Republicans are using the practice to attack Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock in the heated race for a Georgia Senate seat, which is set for a runoff December 6. His Republican opponent, Herschel Walker, assailed Warnock’s use of the campaign funds this month — one of multiple ...
Real Estate Investors Sold Somali Families on a Fast Track to Homeownership in Minnesota. The Buyers Risk Losing Everything.
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Real Estate Investors Sold Somali Families on a Fast Track to Homeownership in Minnesota. The Buyers Risk Losing Everything.

This story was originally published by ProPublica. By Jessica Lussenhop, ProPublica, and Joey Peters, Sahan Journal, with data analysis by Haru Coryne, ProPublica For many Somali families in Minnesota, the barriers to home ownership have long seemed insurmountable: reluctant lenders, low incomes, short work histories, little credit. Members of the East African Muslim community encounter an additional, unique challenge: Because of the principles of their faith, many avoid paying or profiting from interest. This means they typically won’t apply for traditional mortgages. As a result, the conventional path to buying a house — and the accompanying hope of building generational wealth — has been nearly impossible. Roughly three years ago, a handful of lending firms began offer...
Advocates for Black women in politics want the Democratic Party to learn from the midterms
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Advocates for Black women in politics want the Democratic Party to learn from the midterms

This story was originally published by The 19th Runs by Cheri Beasley, Val Demings and Stacey Abrams both underscored long-standing challenges to Black women who run — and showed their potential. By Candice Norwood, The 19th A record number of Black women, most of them Democrats, ran for political office this year. They will set records next year, too, with an estimated high of 10 Black women serving in statewide executive offices simultaneously next year and 27 Black women in the U.S. House. Two glaring absences remain, however: No Black women sit in the U.S. Senate, and the country has never had a Black woman governor. But even with those gaps, the Black women who ran moved the needle forward in notable ways, according to leaders of The Collective PAC, Higher Heigh...
A brief history of Georgia’s runoff voting – and how this year’s contest between two Black men is a sign of progress
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A brief history of Georgia’s runoff voting – and how this year’s contest between two Black men is a sign of progress

By Joshua Holzer, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Westminster College In the U.S., all elections are administered by the states. But not all states use the same rules. Georgia uses a version of runoff voting, which entails two rounds of voting. Typically, if a candidate wins more than 50% of the votes in the first round, that candidate is declared the winner. If not, the two candidates with the most first-round votes face off in a second round of voting. There’s historically been concern that such a runoff system disadvantages Black candidates. Former Assistant U.S. Attorney General John R. Dunne once argued that Georgia’s runoff voting system has had “a demonstrably chilling effect on the ability of Blacks to become candidates for public office.” U.S. Rep. James ...
Karen Bass becomes the first woman elected mayor of Los Angeles
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Karen Bass becomes the first woman elected mayor of Los Angeles

This story was originally published by The 19th By Nadra Nittle, The 19th  Karen Bass has made history, defeating billionaire real estate developer Rick Caruso to become the first woman — and the first Black woman — elected mayor of Los Angeles, Decision Desk HQ projects. Bass garnered 53 percent of the vote to Caruso’s 47 percent. Although Bass is a veteran politician — she was elected to California's 47th Assembly district in 2004 and to Congress in 2010 — her victory against Caruso was far from assured. Having never held political office, Caruso poured roughly $100 million of his own money into the mayoral campaign, outspending Bass 13 to 1. His immense wealth and real estate background drew comparisons to former President Donald Trump, although Caruso ran for mayor as ...
Math teachers in virtual classes tend to view girls and Black students as less capable
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Math teachers in virtual classes tend to view girls and Black students as less capable

By Yasemin Copur-Gencturk, University of Southern California; Ian Thacker, The University of Texas at San Antonio, and Joseph Cimpian, New York University The Research Brief is a short take about interesting academic work. The big idea In virtual classrooms, math teachers deem Black students as less capable than white students. They also view girls as less capable than boys. That’s what we found after we conducted an experiment with 1,000 teachers in schools throughout the United States. For our experiment, we had teachers evaluate student answers to various math problems. Those answers were accompanied by images of different students online. We asked them to tell us how correct the students’ answers were. We also asked them to tell us how capable they thought the student was a...
317,793 people were arrested for marijuana possession in 2020 despite the growing legalization movement
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317,793 people were arrested for marijuana possession in 2020 despite the growing legalization movement

By Katharine Neill Harris, Rice University More than 300,000 people were arrested for cannabis possession in 2020, FBI records show. Meanwhile, the drug is being legally sold for a profit in 19 states. That arrest number may sound high, but arrests have actually been going down each year since 2010 as more states legalize medical or recreational use of the drug. In 2019, for example, more than 500,000 marijuana possession arrests were reported, so the 2020 arrest numbers represent a single-year decline of 36%. In another sign of change, 2020 – the most recent year for which I consider the data reliable – was the first year that marijuana possession was not the most common cause for a drug arrest. Out of roughly 1.16 million drug arrests nationwide that year, 36% were for posse...